It would have:

An orientation to learning

System and organisational goals provide the focus for learning. However, it is the underpinning organisational structures and processes that determine opportunities for learning and its role in decision making.

Devolved management structures

Hierarchical, command-and-control organisational structures are not conducive to effective adaptive learning within dynamic and complex systems. Devolved management structures based on trust, openness, cooperation and respect can enhance self-organising processes.

Nested goals across scales

Short, medium and long term strategies provide a 'map' for learning. Flexibility, particularly in medium and long term strategies, allows for modification based on reflexive practice and new insights. Cycles of learning should be linked to other regular planning processes such as budget cycles.

Monitoring and evaluation at required scales

The role of an adaptive learning organisation is to develop capacity to access or generate a range of information and associated responses to achieve system goals in a sustainable way. Monitoring and evaluation is vital to assess and demonstrate the links between goals, actions and outcomes across a diversity of scales.

Societal validation of outcomes

Adaptive organisations form part of broader networks where they influence and are influenced through their decisions and activities by broader systems. Societal validation, underpinned by participatory processes that consciously and creatively addresses power imbalances and the need for meaningful engagement, is essential.

References for It would have:

Smith, T.. F. (2006).  Institutionalising adaptive learning for coastal management.. Coastal management in Australia: Key institutional and governance issues for coastal natural resource management and planning..
James, C.. R. (2002).  Designing learning organizations. Organizational Dynamics. 32(1), 
Lal, P.., Lim-Applegate H.., & Scoccimarro M.. (2001).  The adaptive decision-making process as a tool for integrated natural resource management: focus, attitudes, and approach. Conservation Ecology. 5(2), 
Davidson-Hunt, I.J.. (2006).  Adaptive learning networks: Developing resource management knowledge through social learning forums.. Human Ecology. 34(4), 
Smith, T.F.., Carter R.W.., Thomsen D.C.., Mayes G.., Nursey-Bray M.., Whisson G.., et al. (2009).  Enhancing science impact in the coastal zone through adaptive learning. Journal of Coastal Research. Special Issue 56,
Smith, T.. F. (2014).  Adaptive Learning Theme Fact Sheet.
Myers, S.., Thomsen D.C.., Tarte D.., Dutra L.., Ellis N.., Th√©baud O.., et al. (2012).  Adaptive learning and coastal management. In, Kenchington, R., Stocker, L. & Wood, D. (Eds) Sustainable Coastal Management and Climate Change: Lessons from Regional Australia. Chapter 7,
Stephenson, C.., Thomsen D.C.., Mayes G.., & Smith T.F.. (2011).  Shock treatment: adaptive learning in response to the South-East Queensland oil spill. In, Wallendorf, L., Jones, C. Ewing, L. & Battalio, B. (Eds). Solutions to Coastal Disasters 2011. 887-898.
Gidley, J.., Fien J., Thomsen D.C.., & Smith T.F.. (2010).  Participatory Futures Methods as Social Learning: Towards Adaptability and Resilience in Climate-vulnerable Communities. Environmental Policy and Governance. 19(6), 427-440.
Gidley, J.., Fien J., Thomsen D.C.., & Smith T.F.. (2010).  Participatory Futures Methods as Social Learning: Towards Adaptability and Resilience in Climate-vulnerable Communities. Environmental Policy and Governance. 19(6), 427-440.