What are we learning for?

The coastal zone is valued by many communities who rely on these diverse systems to meet fundamental needs and established ways of life. Located in the dynamic and transitional space between the marine and terrestrial ecosystems, the coastal zone is one of the most biologically productive ecosystems directly supporting the nutritional needs of many communities and indirectly supporting many others through contributions to marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

The coastal zone is also valued for aesthetic, recreational and spiritual amenities and attracts significant numbers of permanent residents and tourists. Globally, over 2.2 billion people live within 100km of the coastline1. In Australia, almost 90% of the population lives within 100km of the coastline1 and coastal tourism was worth $20 billion (2000-4)2.

The pressures of climate change (e.g. sea level rise and storm surge) and development in the coastal zone will significantly impact coastal communities and all those that benefit from coastal services.

Coastline image

References for What are we learning for?

Smith, T.. F. (2006).  Institutionalising adaptive learning for coastal management.. Coastal management in Australia: Key institutional and governance issues for coastal natural resource management and planning..
James, C.. R. (2002).  Designing learning organizations. Organizational Dynamics. 32(1), 
Lal, P.., Lim-Applegate H.., & Scoccimarro M.. (2001).  The adaptive decision-making process as a tool for integrated natural resource management: focus, attitudes, and approach. Conservation Ecology. 5(2), 
Davidson-Hunt, I.J.. (2006).  Adaptive learning networks: Developing resource management knowledge through social learning forums.. Human Ecology. 34(4), 
Smith, T.F.., Carter R.W.., Thomsen D.C.., Mayes G.., Nursey-Bray M.., Whisson G.., et al. (2009).  Enhancing science impact in the coastal zone through adaptive learning. Journal of Coastal Research. Special Issue 56,
Smith, T.. F. (2014).  Adaptive Learning Theme Fact Sheet.
Myers, S.., Thomsen D.C.., Tarte D.., Dutra L.., Ellis N.., Thébaud O.., et al. (2012).  Adaptive learning and coastal management. In, Kenchington, R., Stocker, L. & Wood, D. (Eds) Sustainable Coastal Management and Climate Change: Lessons from Regional Australia. Chapter 7,
Stephenson, C.., Thomsen D.C.., Mayes G.., & Smith T.F.. (2011).  Shock treatment: adaptive learning in response to the South-East Queensland oil spill. In, Wallendorf, L., Jones, C. Ewing, L. & Battalio, B. (Eds). Solutions to Coastal Disasters 2011. 887-898.
Gidley, J.., Fien J., Thomsen D.C.., & Smith T.F.. (2010).  Participatory Futures Methods as Social Learning: Towards Adaptability and Resilience in Climate-vulnerable Communities. Environmental Policy and Governance. 19(6), 427-440.
Gidley, J.., Fien J., Thomsen D.C.., & Smith T.F.. (2010).  Participatory Futures Methods as Social Learning: Towards Adaptability and Resilience in Climate-vulnerable Communities. Environmental Policy and Governance. 19(6), 427-440.

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